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Practical Information International Conference Democratic Participation 27-30 June 2011.pdf
Registration Form International Conference Democratic Participation June 2011.doc
Democratic Participation conference 2011 program June 2011.pdf .

The conference organisers would like to remind the participants that
the papers are to be sent to the conference mail by 15th of June to be
included in the conference proceedings.
If the authors wish to share their communications with the members of
ISA RC10 that were not able to join the conference they can also
upload them here at our wiki site at
http://isarc10internetforum.wikispaces.com/RC10+2011, next to their name
in the preliminary program copied below:

The International Sociological Association (ISA) Research Committee 10 (RC10) on
“Participation, Organizational Democracy & Self-Management” in cooperation with:
Institutions et Dynamiques Historiques de l’Economie (IDHE) UMR8533
of the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) at the Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS) de Cachan;
the Institut Fédératif Européen Pluridisciplinaire (IFEP) “Droits, Régulations et Transformations Sociales”
de l’Université Paul Cézanne, Aix-Marseille;
the Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES);
and the European Sociological Association (ESA) Research Network on
“Industrial Relations, Labour Market Institutions and Employment” (RN17)
Invite you to the International Conference on
Democratic Participation in Employment and Societal Regulation
Hosted by IDHE UMR 8533 CNRS at
Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan
61, Avenue du Président Wilson 94235 Cachan Cedex, FRANCE
Amphi Marie Curie, Bâtiment d'Alembert
27th to 30th of June 2011
Page précédente (détail) et ci-dessus : deux grandes fresques peintes sur toile marouflée
Previous page (detail) and above : two large murals painted on canvas
Jacques Villon (1875-1963)
Hall Villon, bâtiment d’Alembert
Organizing Committee:
Isabel da Costa, President ISA/RC10; Senior Researcher CNRS-IDHE, France, Conference Coordinator
Alain Chouraqui, Director of the IFEP, CNRS Research Director, France, past President ISA/RC10
György Széll, Prof. em. Dr., University of Osnabrück, Germany, past President ISA/RC10
Scientific Committee:
Alain Chouraqui, Director of the IFEP, CNRS Research Director, France, past President ISA/RC10
Isabel da Costa, President ISA/RC10; Senior Researcher CNRS-IDHE, France
Claude Didry, CNRS Research Director, Director of IDHE, France;
Francesco Garibaldo, President RLDWL, Vice-President ISA/RC10, Italy;
Janine Goetschy, Senior Researcher CNRS-IDHE, Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense, France ;
Annette Jobert, CNRS Research Director, IDHE, France;
Udo Rehfeldt, Senior Researcher IRES, France;
Julia Rozanova, Yale University, USA and the University of British Columbia, Canada, ISA/RC10 Secretary
Heinz Sünker, University of Wuppertal and past President ISA/RC10, Germany ;
György Széll, Prof. em. Dr., University of Osnabrück, Germany, past President ISA/RC10
Volker Telljohann, Senior Researcher IRES Emilia Romagna, Italy ;
3
Preliminary program / Programme préliminaire
Regulation issues have become priorities in the political agendas of most European countries confronted with global economic, financial
and social crises, while the capability of some of the institutions of the political and civil society to deal with these changes has come under
scrutiny and even sometimes questioning. This evolution has once more brought to the fore the issue of democratic participation,
particularly in the field of industrial relations where it has been an important concern ever since the publication of the book Industrial
Democracy by Sidney and Beatrice Webb in 1897 launched the first international debate around this issue. Democratic participation in
employment and societal regulation will thus constitute the main theme of this conference.
Major reforms, notably those concerning social security and industrial relations arrangements, have recently taken place in many European
countries. Old arrangements are being challenged and new actors and interaction arenas have emerged. These trends will be discussed in
several plenary sessions and workshops by participants coming from different disciplines as well as backgrounds bringing complementary
perspectives to an open and pluralistic debate. Beyond academic achievement we also hope that our exchanges might contribute to an
increased awareness of these issues that might help orient the future actions of the European social actors. Some of these actors are
expected to directly participate in the discussions during several round tables as well as in the networking during the conference.
The conference will be organized around several main themes that will be addressed both in plenary sessions and workshops. It will also
include round tables with invited guests, a forward looking session and a joint session between ISA RC10 (International Sociological
Association, Research Committee 10 on Participation, Organizational Democracy & Self-Management) and ESA RN17 (European
Sociological Association, Research Network 17 on Industrial Relations, Labour Market Institutions and Employment), resulting from a
collaboration between our two networks started when Franz Traxler was President of RN17 (this joint session will be dedicated to his
memory).
Monday June 27
Registration
9h30 – 10h30 (Hall de l’Amphi Marie Curie, Bâtiment d'Alembert)
10h30 – 11h00 Coffee Break
Opening session/Séance d’ouverture
11h00 – 13h00 (Amphi Marie Curie, Bâtiment d'Alembert)
Welcome Addresses
Jean-Yves Mérindol, Director of ENS Cachan
Isabel da Costa, President of ISA/RC10
Keynote Speeches
Claude Didry, Director, Institutions et Dynamiques Historiques de l’Economie (IDHE - UMR 8533 CNRS)
« Institutions and Democratic Participation »
Alain Chouraqui, Director, Institut Fédératif Européen Pluridisciplinaire (IFEP) “Droits, Régulations et
Transformations Sociales” de l’Université Paul Cézanne, Aix-Marseille
« Participation in regulating societal changes »
Erika Mezger, Deputy Director, European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions
(EUROFOUND) / Fondation européenne pour l'amélioration des conditions de vie et de travail
13h00 – 14h00 Lunch
4
Social Actors in a Multi-level and Multi-modal Regulation 1
14h00 – 16h00 (Amphi Marie Curie, Bâtiment d'Alembert)
Chairs / Présidents: Alain Chouraqui & György Széll
Vincenzo Ferrari (University of Milan)
"Le rôle des acteurs dans un droit du travail italien déstructuré"
Maria da Conceição Cerdeira (ISCSP/Technical University of Lisbon and CAPP) &
João Dias, (ISEG/Technical University of Lisbon and UECE)
“Social dialogue in Portugal in a time of crisis”
Philippe Mioche (Chaire Jean Monnet, Université de Provence Aix-en-Provence)
« Le Comité Economique et Social Européen producteur de normes ? Une approche historique »
Janet McIntyre-Mills (Flinders University, Australia)
“The Way Forward? Controlling Consumption Through Governance and Participatory Democracy: Learning
Less is More When Living Elegantly and Ethically”
The aim of this stream is to contribute to the understanding of the interaction between rights and regulations on the one hand, and social
transformations, crises and diverse types of changes on the other hand. The sessions will emphasise the role of social actors in the process
of social transformation in a perspective of multi-level and multi-modal regulations. Multidisciplinary papers were welcomed in order to
analyse at national, European and global levels:
· how law affects social regulation but, at the same time, is also affected or produced by social interaction;
· the effects of crises and other social transformations on the forms, levels and articulations of different "modes" of regulations, (legal,
social, political, economic or other);
· and the evolution of the roles of the actors and the institutions in these regulatory processes.
16h00 – 16h30 Coffee Break
European Social Dialogue: Participation and Regulation
16h30 – 18h30 (Amphi Marie Curie, Bâtiment d'Alembert)
Chairs / Présidents: Annette Jobert & Claude Didry
Claude Didry & Annette Jobert (IDHE, UMR 8533 CNRS, ENS Cachan)
« Social Dialogue and Deliberation: a New Dimension in European Industrial Relations »
Philippe Barré & Mélanie Laroche (Ecole de relations industrielles, Université de Montréal)
“Social dialogue in Quebec: Participation of the collective actors in the economic and social regulation”
Hervé Champin (IDHE, ENS Cachan)
« Le Dialogue social européen sectoriel, un outil de régulation »
Jean-Vincent Koster (IDHE, Université Paris Ouest Nanterre, La Défense)
« Dialogue social européen et marché du travail, l'accord-cadre sur les ‘marchés du travail inclusifs’ »
European Social Dialogue (ESD) is now a Treaty procedure associating the European Social Partners to the elaboration of European
legislation on employment relations and workers’ participation in certain enterprises’ choices or decisions. It originated in the 1980’s under
the Delors Presidency alongside the theme of the ‘democratization of the economy’ in the 1970’s. Twenty years after its
institutionalisation, ESD poses several major questions to be addressed in this stream.
· How does ESD deepen the dynamic of European integration launched by Jacques Delors, through an extension of the Dialogue from
specialised negotiations on the issues of the employment contract and the working time, to more general deliberations on new
European policies that imply choices of models of society? Its contribution to the discussion on the work life balance, the general
interest services or the energy policies for example, involves exchanges with civil society representatives which could lead to a
renewal of the social dialogue through its opening to what has been called the ‘civil dialogue’.
· The institutions produced by the ESD such as the EWC directive or the Workers Information and Consultation directive are major
contributions to the enhancement of the capabilities of the workers representatives to weigh on the choices of the firms. What are
the concrete results of such directives in the European economy? Do the national implementations of these directives give actual
capability for voices to the workers, especially in countries where unions and workers representations have been weakened by liberal
policies, such as the UK or the PECO? Do the new forms of representation resulting from these directives provide capabilities to the
restructuring processes that firms face in an internationalised economy?
18h30 – 20h Reception
5
Tuesday June 28
Participation throughout life: from Childhood and Youth Education to Aging
9h00 – 11h00 (Amphi Marie Curie, Bâtiment d'Alembert)
Chairs / Présidents: Julia Rozanova & Heinz Sünker
Keynote Presentations
Heinz Sünker (Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Germany; past President ISA/RC10)
“Challenges of participatory democracy and childhood and youth education”
Diane-Gabrielle Tremblay (Télé-université, Université du Québec, UQAM, Canada)
Titulaire de la chaire de recherche du Canada sur les enjeux socio-organisationnels de l'économie du savoir
(Canada Research Chair on the socio-organizational challenges of the Knowledge Economy)- Directrice de
l’ARUC sur la gestion des âges et des temps sociaux (CRSH) - Director of the CURA on work-life balance over
the lifecourse (SSHRC)
“Active aging: A participatory and empowering policy or a responsibilization of individuals?”
Paper Communications
P.P. Balan (Professor-cum-Director, Centre for Research in Rural & Industrial Development - CRRID, India)
“From Cradle to Grave’: Experience of an Indian State on Participatory Planning”
Iasonas Lamprianou, Savvas Katsikidis, & Kyriakos Demetriou
(Department of Social and Political Sciences, University of Cyprus, Cyprus)
“The relationship between political participation and early retirement”
Carmen Bastidas (Department of Sociology, University of Oriente, Venezuela) & Riolama de Verde (Institute
of Technology, Cumana, and Research Associate, University of Oriente, Venezuela)
“Creative discourse and use of the juvenile sapience in the new democratic leadership”
Julia Rozanova (University of British Columbia, Canada & Yale University, USA)
“The master of disguise: Hidden faces of ageism as barriers to social participation of older adults”
Democracy is based on the existence of educated and informed citizens. Real education is based on the competences of all members of a
society, and is a life-long process. To accomplish this we need to deal with experiences of participation in the lives of people of all ages,
from children and youth to young adults, to individuals in mid-life and to older adults. As the opposite of participation is exclusion, it is also
essential to consider mechanisms by which society may exclude some groups of citizens from participation because of their age (or other
characteristics). It is particularly relevant in the case of young children, who may be considered too young to be competent to meaningfully
participate in the process of making decisions that have direct impact on their lives, and the oldest ones, who are considered too old to
have competencies for meaningful participation. This exclusion from participation of certain age groups on the assumption of their political
and social incompetence may be rife with potential controversies and neglect of their interests and ultimately exploitation. Therefore
participation is a key component in concepts of politics of childhood and youth as well as later life. The papers addressing this theme will
deal with different approaches concerned with participation across the life-course in different societies, with particular emphasis on
participation in childhood and youth and in later life (separately or in comparative perspective).
11h00 – 11h30 Coffee Break
6
European Governance: a model of employment and societal regulation?
11h30 – 13h00 (Amphi Marie Curie, Bâtiment d'Alembert)
Chairs / Présidents: Janine Goetschy & J. Leschke
Janine Goetschy (CNRS-IDHE, Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense, France) &
J. Leschke (European Trade Union Institute – ETUI-REHS)
“Economic governance from the Lisbon strategy to Europe 2020 - a few introductory thoughts”
Andrew Watt, (ETUI-REHS)
“Economic governance in the EU in the crisis”
Sophie Jacquot (Centre d'Etudes Européennes de Sciences Politiques Paris)
“New governance in the field of EU gender equality policy”
Stéphane de La Rosa (Faculté de droit de Valenciennes, Université Lille Nord de France)
“Some legal aspects of the open method of coordination”
Social Europe developments have been closely linked to three major factors: a) the dynamics of the European integration project – in
particular the nature of its successive enlargements, b) its successive political economy objectives (internal market, EMU, the Lisbon
Strategy, Europe 2020), and c) EU Members States’ own social and employment evolving policy agendas.
Over the last 50 years, the EU level has been displaying a complex web of substantive and procedural rules in the field of employment and
social policy. This stream aims at understanding the ways in which such a European web of rules was built over time. What is their degree
of internal coherence or fragmentation? What can be said about their relevance vis-à-vis evolving social and employment agendas at
national and world levels?
Similar questions will be addressed as regards EU rule-making procedures. Indeed, the profound legitimacy component inherent to social
matters, the EU treaties content (and their limitations) as well as growing EU internal diversity have been leading over time to a plurality of
EU regulatory modes (legislative, open method of coordination, corporatist).
Social Europe has been built as a result of contradictory forces among Member States, among social partners as well as among EU supranational
institutions around evolving policy agendas. Over recent years, one could witness new tensions regarding the balance to be found
between deepened freedom of movement and the respect of social rights, and as concerns the question of migrant workers. This stream
aims at taking stock of past Social Europe developments as well as of the more recent tensions which have arisen in last years – tensions
likely to have been increasing even more with the two economic and financial crises (2008 and 2009).
13h00 – 14h15 Lunch
Parallel Workshops and Book presentations
14h15 – 16h00 (different locations, check workshop session of the Program)
16h00 – 16h30 Coffee Break
Regulation by the Social Partners in the context of Globalisation
16h30 – 18h30 (Amphi Marie Curie, Bâtiment d'Alembert)
Round table chaired and introduced by: Isabel da Costa & Udo Rehfeldt
Invited speakers:
Kostas Papadakis (Research and Policy Development Specialist, Industrial and Employment Relations
Department, International Labour Office (ILO)
Fernando Vasquez (Deputy Head of Unit, European Commission, Directorate-General for Employment, Social
Affairs and Inclusion - EMPL/C/2 - New Skills for New Jobs, Adaptation to Change, CSR and EGF)
Marie-Noelle Lopez (Planet Labour )
Georg Leutert (Ford EWC)
and tbc
with Trade Unions, Management and EU actors involved in Global and European Framework Agreements
7
Wednesday June 29
Parallel Workshops and Book presentations
9h00 – 10h45 (different locations, check workshop session of the Program)
10h45 – 11h15 Coffee Break
De nouveaux défis pour les Partenaires Sociaux/New Challenges for the Social Partners:
Restructuring, Green Economy, Financial Control
11h15 – 13h00 (Amphi Marie Curie, Bâtiment d'Alembert)
Round table organized and led by: Isabella Biletta & co-chaired by: Catherine Bloch-London
Isabella Biletta (European Foundation for the Improvement of Living & Working Conditions /Eurofound)
Suzanne Srodogora (Directrice Recherche,Innovation, Enseignement Supérieur, Région Ile de France)
Dieter Waizenegger (Director SEIU Capital Stewardship Program, Europe);
Alain Mestre (Syndex, France)
13h00 – 14h00 Lunch
Evolutions in labour and employment relations
Joint stream ISA/RC10 and ESA/RN17 dedicated to the late Franz Traxler
14h00 – 16h00 (Amphi Marie Curie, Bâtiment d'Alembert)
Chairs / Présidents: Bernd Brandl & Isabel da Costa,
Richard Hyman (London School of Economics, UK)
“Comparative Research and Globalization/ La recherche comparée et la mondialisation”
Guglielmo Meardi, (Warwick Business School, UK)
"The transnationalisation of industrial relations in Europe"
Vera Glassner (ETUI, Belgium) & Toralf Pusch (Halle Institute for Economic Research, Germany)
“Does EMU foster cross-border coordination of wage bargaining? Empirical evidence from the metal sector in
Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany”
Mirella Baglioni (Universita di Parma, Italy; Chair RN17/ESA)
"Industrial Relations after the crisis. Reformulating research questions on path dependency"
« Relations de travail après la crise: reconsidérer les questions de la recherche sur la path dependency »
Lucio Baccaro (Université de Genève, Suisse; member of the Board RN17/ESA)
“Reformulating the argument about convergence: Industrial relations institutions in Europe since the oil
shocks”
Bernd Brandl (University of Vienna, Austria; Vice-Chair RN17/ESA)
“Successful Incomes Policy Concertation: the Economic Effects of Social Pacts and its Alternatives”
Isabel da Costa (President RC 10/ISA, member of the Board RN17/ESA)
“Concluding remarks”
The organization of labour has always been sensitive to crises and has faced fundamental changes in the past. The impact of previous crises
on organized labour has frequently been perceived as dramatic particularly as regards the evolution of employment and restructuring.
Communications in this session will focus on the implications of the current economic crisis for the interaction between policy and
organized labour taking into account past experiences and past changes: will labour relations undergo restructuring processes on a scale
similar or even larger than the alterations caused by the shocks of 1929 or the oil crisis of the 1970s? To what extent will industrial
relations affect and be affected by policy responses to the crisis? How has the public sector been affected in different countries? At what
levels have what changes been more often addressed – local, sector, region, national, European, international? What hypothesis and
methods have researchers, analysts and/or actors used to address these issues? What kind of new issues have emerged with the recent
crisis? The stream will also include communications dedicated to contribution of Franz Traxler to the understanding of labour and
employment relations.
8
16h00 – 16h30 Coffee Break
Social Actors in a Multi-level and Multi-modal Regulation 2
16h30 – 18h30 (Amphi Marie Curie, Bâtiment d'Alembert)
Chairs / Présidents: Alain Chouraqui & György Széll
Stavroula Demetriades (European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions, Ireland)
Friedrich Fürstenberg (University of Bonn, Germany)
“Regulative Harmonisation and Political Contest: Trends in the EU Labor Market”
Blandine Chelini-Pont (Université Paul Cézanne, Aix-en-Provence)
"Acteurs et religion dans l'évolution du droit du travail"
Juan Monreal (University of Murcia, Spain)
“The role of the ‘formal’ and ‘informal’ Spanish Actors in the regulation processes”
Philippe Mosse (Laboratoire de l’Économie et de Sociologie du Travail/ L.E.S.T - C.N.R.S., Aix-en-Provence)
"When Flexibility can be a good deal between workers expectations and firms’ needs; the example of French
Hospitals"
The session will focus on the role of social actors in the process of social transformation in a perspective of multi-level and multi-modal
regulations, taking into account the global dimension and focussing on European experiences. Contradictions and conflicts will be analysed.
20h00 – 23h00 Conference Dinner
Between 8 a.m. and 8:30 p.m. :
embark quai Malaquais, under the ‘Pont des Arts’ bridge, left bank, opposite the Louvre museum.
Ship departure is at 9 p.m.
The cruise lasts two hours through historical Paris.
Cruise route :
Whilst enjoying your dinner, you’ll contemplate some of the most beautiful monuments of Paris:
Notre Dame, the Louvre, the Musée d'Orsay, the Grand Palais, the Invalides, the Palais de Chaillot and the Eiffel Tower
and it’s most remarkable bridges:
Pont Neuf, Pont Marie, Pont Alexandre III, Pont au Double, Tournelle Bridge....
At 11 p.m. :the boat returns to dock.
9
Thursday June 30
Employee participation through EWCs
and in the framework of the European Company (SE)
9h00 – 11h00 (Amphi Marie Curie, Bâtiment d'Alembert)
Chairs / Présidents: Udo Rehfeldt & Michael Stollt
Employee participation through EWCs
Jeremy Waddington (University of Manchester/ETUI)
“The EWC: a Transnational Industrial Relations Institution in the Making”
Romuald Jagodzinski (ETUI)
“The Current Status of EWCs after the Recast Directive”
Elodie Bethoux (IDHE-ENS Cachan)
“EWCs in Times of Restructuring”
Employee participation through the European Company (SE)
Michael Stollt (European Trade Union Institute – ETUI)
“The Current Status of SE Founding and Employee Involvement 10 Years after Adopting the SE Directive”
Udo Rehfeldt (Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales -- IRES)
“The Europeanization of Employee Involvement: Practical Experience from 10 SE Case Studies”
The 1994 European directive on European works councils (EWCs) was a late outcome of a project of European legislation dating back to
1970, the European Company Statute, in which the European Commission provided simultaneously three channels for employee
participation:
· European collective agreements concluded directly between the company and the unions represented in the various
institutions,
· a European works council to be regularly informed on the evolution of economic and social parameters of the company and to
be consulted prior to any major changes,
· participation of employee representatives in the supervisory board for at least a third of its members.
In the 1970s, the Commission's draft, which was largely inspired by the German system of codetermination, had provoked hostile reactions
not only by employers’ organizations but also by most of the EC-9 union organisations. It was only in 1994 that a European directive (recast
in 2009) imposed negotiations on the establishment of EWCs with information and consultation rights in transnational companies. This
legislation was complemented in 2000 by a regulation and a directive on the European Company (SE), which imposes negotiations on
employee involvement including board level participation for such companies. The third part of the initial Commission project,
transnational collective bargaining, has developed in the last ten years, a number of agreements having been signed but remaining, for the
moment, without a European legal basis. These transnational company agreements were the topic of a specific round table at this
Conference.
This session will try to make an assessment of both forms of workers participation.
· How have EWCs and SEs spread over the years?
· What is the quality of these agreements?
· What is the impact of these transnational participation rights for the defence of workers’ interests in practice?
· How were strategic decisions of the company influenced, in particular in the case of transnational restructuring?
· How are unions involved in these fields?
· What will be the impact of the 2009 revision of the EWC directive when it will come into effect in 2011?
11h00 – 11h30 Coffee Break
10
Democratic participation and civil society
11h30 – 13h00 (Amphi Marie Curie, Bâtiment d'Alembert)
Chairs / Présidents: Francesco Garibaldo & Volker Telljohann
Catherine Casey (School of Management, University of Leicester, United Kingdom)
“We, the People at Work: Citizens, Industrial Democracy, Governance”
Valeria Pulignano (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium)
“Identity, Solidarity and Non-Market Values: Prospects for Social Democracy in Europe?”
Paul-André Lapointe & Guy Cucumel (Dptm des relations industrielles, Université Laval, Québec, Canada)
“Teamwork diversity”
Francesco Garibaldo (President RLDWL, Vice-President ISA/RC10, Italy) &
Volker Telljohann (IRES Emilia Romagna, Italy)
“Democracy at work - a comparison of a German and an Italian case”
The cultural aspiration for participatory democratic society and more equitable social distribution of power continues to be formally highly
valued in European societies. Yet, as a number of social analysts have observed, many aspects of democratic practices have seriously
diminished in some key areas of social life in recent years. Economic processes seem to be less controlled by social, political, administrative
and cultural instances of regulation. This lack of control entails a divide between economic institutions and society at large.
The world of labour is an important area where this divide can be observed. The world of labour and employment, which since the mid-20th
century has been regarded as a vital arena for the advancement of participatory democracy, appears at the present time powerfully
influenced by forces and interests that weaken and undermine this social project. The aspiration for wide social participation in the
regulation and governance of labour and workplaces encounters a crisis. Current tendencies in the management of production
organizations and industrial relations require workers’ integration not through democratic citizenship and representation, but through
conformity to elite-established rules and systems. The recalibration of capital and labour relations that has ensued has weakened not only
workers and their trade unions in socio-political roles but threatens the practices and values of social democracy itself. The search for
socio-cultural innovation is thus a pressing theoretical and practical project.
The aim of this theme will be to analyse current concerns in regard to the conditions of labour markets, production organizations, working
conditions, and industrial and employment relations. Prominent among these concerns is the crisis in trade unions and in democratic
labour market institutions, and the rise of what many critics regard as technocratic administrative powers displacing democratic practices.
These concerns, which may be seen as part of broader crisis in democracy, require careful evidence-based analysis. What are the principal
factors of the crisis? How successful are current efforts in response? Has a recalibration of labour and capital relations set an institutional
path dependency for a long time to come? What are the options for social and economic policies? In this context, theoretical approaches
analysing the need for new governance systems at all societal levels will be discussed as well as the need for a new definition of the role of
the State and the civil society.
13h00 – 14h15 Lunch
Parallel Workshops and Book presentations
14h45 – 16h30 (different locations, check workshop session of the Program)
16h30 – 17h00 Coffee Break
Forward Looking Session
17h00 – 18h30 (Amphi Marie Curie, Bâtiment d'Alembert)
Chairs / Présidents: György Széll & Francesco Garibaldo
Marc Pena (President of the University Paul Cézanne, Aix-en-Provence)
Stavroula Demestriades (European Foundation for the Improvement of Living & Working Conditions)
Philippe Pochet (General Director of the European Trade Union Institute)
Suzanne Srodogora ((Directrice Recherche,Innovation, Enseignement Supérieur, Région Ile de France)
Isabel da Costa (President of RC 10/ISA, member of the Board RN17/ESA)
In this session the panelists will answer mainly the following questions:
1. What is the role of societal regulation for enhancing democratic participation?
2. Are there European specificities, which may serve as a model for other world regions?
3. What have trade unions contributed so far in enhancing democratic participation and what can/should they contribute in the
future?
4. What is the role of science in this endeavour?
11
Stream 1
Social Actors in a Multi-level and Multi-modal Regulation :
Organized by Alain Chouraqui & György Széll
Stream 2
Democratic participation and civil society in the world of work
Organized by Francesco Garibaldo & Volker Telljohann
Stream 3
Participation throughout life: from Childhood and Youth Education to Aging.
Organized by Julia Rozanova & Heinz Sünker
Stream 4
European Governance: a model of employment and societal regulation?
Organized by Janine Goetschy & tbc
Stream 5
European Social Dialogue
Organized by Annette Jobert & Claude Didry
Stream 6
Employee participation through EWCs and in the framework of the European Company (SE)
Organized by Udo Rehfeldt & Michael Stollt
Stream 7
Evolutions in labour and employment relations. Joint session ISA/RC10 and ESA/RN17r
Organized by Bernd Brandl & Isabel da Costa
S1 W1 = Stream 1 Workshop Session 1
S1 BP 1= Stream 1 Book Presentation 1
12
Tuesday June 28 14h15 – 16h00
S1 W1
Actors in a Multi-level and Multi-modal Regulation
Chair:
Reynald Bourque (Université de Montréal, Canada) & Marc-Antonin Hennebert (HEC-Montréal, Canada)
« Articulation des niveaux et des formes d’action syndicale dans le contexte de la mondialisation : le cas du
réseau syndical UNI@Quebecor World »
Shlomo Getz (University of Haifa & Academic College of Emek Yezreel, Israel)
“The Role of State Regulation in the Social Transformation of the Kibbutzim”
Carsten Strøby Jensen, (University of Copenhagen, Denmark)
“Comparative Perspectives on Social Stratification and Trade Unions in US, Asia and Europe”
Janet McIntyre-Mills (Flinders University, Australia)
“The Liberative Potential of Scaling up the Aarhus Convention to Protect the Global Commons and the Public
Good”
W. N. Salve (Shri. Venkatesh College, Ichalkaranji, India)
“Democratic Participation of Workers in Management and Status of Seasonal Migrant Workers in India”
S2 W1
Cooperatives/Social Economy in the new Millennium
Organised and Chaired by : Maria Fregidou-Malama and Savvas Katsikidis,
Maria Fregidou-Malama & Michelle Rydback (University of Gävlen Department of Business, Sweden)
“Social Enterprises in Sweden: Unitis a Successfull Social Cooperative?”
Azril Bacal, Paulo Freire Institute ; (IPF)´s representative in the International Councils of the World Social
Forum (WSF) ; and the World Education Forum (WEF)
Patricia Arenas (Cuba)
2012 is the International Year of Cooperatives. In the EU and all around the world efforts and recommendations are made to strengthen
research on cooperatives/Social Economy at the universities. Social Economy and Cooperatives are important organisations contributing to
sustainable business, to employment and to empower people, they are an alternative to private and state businesses. They are democratic
organisations; self managed of their members and contribute to the development of local society and the competition on the market.
What characterises Non Governmental Organisations, their organising, leadership, members´ democracy, social responsibility, women in
cooperatives, micro credits, credit cooperatives, success factors, financial aspects, social capital and social accounting are some interesting
and important issues for research. Comparative Studies between countries can be an interesting issue in today´s international world.
S5 W1
Les salariés acteurs de l’innovation
Organised and Chaired by: Pierre Boisard & Claude Didry
P Boisard & C. Didry ((IDHE, UMR 8533 CNRS, ENS Cachan)
« Recherche Développement, quel travail ? »
Camille Dupuy (Doctorante en sociologie, IDHE, ENS Cachan
« La participation des salariés à l’innovation : le cas de l’outil de production éditoriale du Monde Interactif »
Erwan Lamy (Enseignant chercheur à Advancia, Chambre de Commerce et d’Industrie de Paris, chercheur
associé à l’IDHE Cachan)
« Les « Bonnes Pratiques de Laboratoire » et l’encadrement de l’innovation dans les PME de biotechnologies »
Florent Le Bot
« De la porcelaine aux céramiques, un siècle d’innovation à Limoges »
Jean-Louis Renoux
13
S7 W1.
La participation démocratique à travers l’oeuvre de John Commons
Chaired and introduced by: Bruno Théret (Directeur de recherche CNRS à l’Institut de recherche
interdisciplinaire en socio-économie (IRIS), Université Paris-IX-Dauphine).
Pier-Luc Bilodeau (Département des relations industrielles, Université Laval, Québec, Canada)
« Un gouvernement de l'industrie? Les relations professionnelles dans l'industrie québécoise de la construction
depuis 1968 »
Thierry Kirat (Directeur de recherche au C.N.R.S., UMR 7170 – IRISSO, Institut de Recherche
Interdisciplinaire en Sciences Sociales, Université Paris Dauphine, France) &
Laure Bazzoli (Université Lumière Lyon 2)
« La RSE chez Commons, à propos de la loi du Wisconsin sur l'indemnisation du chômage »
Diane-Gabrielle Tremblay (Télé-université, Université du Québec, UQAM, Canada)
« L’Actualité de John Commons dans la revue Interventions Economiques »
BP 1 & 2 (To be announced)
Meeting Informel du Conseil Scientifique International de l’IFEP
Wednesday June 29 9h00 – 10h45
S2 W2
Patrick Chaskiel (CERTOP, UMR CNRS, UT2, UT3, Toulouse, France)
“French Unions, Nanotechnologies and Civil Society: A new trend ?”
Armel Brice Adanhounme (Research Professional, CRIMT Montreal, Québec, Canada)
« Endangering liberal democracy: The critical future of citizenship at work in the age of globalization »
W. N. Salve (Associate Professor in Economics, Shri Venkatesh College, Ichalkaranji India, Affiliated to Shivaji
University, District: Kolhapur, Maharashtra)
« Democratic Participation of Workers in Management and Status of Seasonal Migrant Workers in India »
S3 W1.
Citizen Participation in the Third Sector:
Some Cases of Social Responsibility and Involvement
Organized by Litsa Nicolaou -SMOKOVITI, (University of Piraeus, Greece)
Chair : George O. Tsobanoglou (University of the Aegean, Department of Sociology, Greece; President, ISA
RC 26 on Sociotechnics & Sociological Practice & by
Co-Chair: Dimosthenis Daskalakis (University of Athens, Greece)
Dimosthenis Daskalakis (Natioanl and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece)
“Forms and Aspects of the Third Sector and Social Participation in Greece: Theoretical approach and empirical
evidence”
George O. Tsobanoglou (University of the Aegean, Department of Sociology, Greece; President, ISA RC 26 on
Sociotechnics & Sociological Practice
“The role of social enterprises and organizational forms for local Community capacity building and
empowerment”
Stefanos Koffas (University Frederick, Cyprus)
“Social responsibility in the third sector. Cases of social participation and social involvement of companies in
Cyprus”
14
S7 W2
Evolutions in labour and employment relations
Jocelyne Robert (HEC-Ecole de gestion, Université de Liège, Belgique)
« Responsabilité sociale en entreprise” et leadership : quelques questions »
Rosa Nonell (Grup de Recerca Polítiques Públiques i Regulació Econòmica, Directora Dep. Política Econòmica
Facultat d'Economia i Empresa, University of Barcelona)
“The determinants of business associations involved in social pacts. It`s similarities and differences between
some European countries during thirty years (1980-2010)”
Barbara Bechter (University of Vienna, Austria) Presenter
Co-authors: Bernd Brandl (University of Vienna) & Guglielmo Meardi (University of Warwick, UK)
“Developments of sectoral level industrial relations systems in the European Union”
Thomas Prosser (Trinity College, Department of Sociology, School of Social Science and Philosophy,
University of Dublin, Republic of Ireland)
“Private interest groups in the EU and the economic crisis”
Andranik Tangian (Hans Boeckler Foundation and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Duesseldorf, Germzany)
“Not for Bad Weather: Flexicurity Challenged by the Crisis”
BP 3 & 4 (To be announced)
Meeting RC10 Board
Thursday June 30 14h45 – 16h30
S1 W2
Actors in a Multi-level and Multi-modal Regulation
Chair: Eleni Nina-Pazarzi, University of Piraeus
Cornelia Delouka-Ingessi (University of Piraeus, Greece )
“The New Approach to EU Consumer Legislation: Towards a ‘High Level of Consumer Protection’ or a
‘Market Behaviour Law’?”
Michalis Pazarzis (University of Piraeus)
“P&I Clubs as a participatory institution in the maritime sector”
Ágnes Utasi & Eleni Nina-Pazarzi (University of Piraeus)
“Community participation, public life and trust”
Volkmar Kreissig,(IEB Chemnitz)
“Participation in Arabic States - realities, trends and chances in future”
S2 W3.
The World of Work
David Van Arsdale (State University of New York, Onondaga, Syracuse, United States)
“Waiting for Work: The Proliferation of Temporary Help Workand Consequences on Urban Deindustrialized
Communities in the United States”
Carmen Bastidas & Efrén Figuera (Department of Sociology. Program of Master in Planning of the
Development of the University of Oriente, Venezuela)
“The democratic participation as civic discourse in the world of the work”
Sebastian Schulze-Marmeling (People, Management and Organisations Division (PMO), Manchester Business
School, The University of Manchester, UK)
« Democratic Participation and External Conflict Resolution »
Binay K Pattnaik (Dept. of Humanities & Social Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, India)
“ICT Revolution and Knowledge Workers of India: Explorations in Sociology of Work”
15
BP 5 & 6 (To be announced)
BP 7 & 8 (To be announced)
Meeting RDWLD
Pavement décoratif / Decorative Pavement
Rez-de-chaussée bas, bâtiment d’Alembert / Lower Ground-Floor, d’Alembert building
Hosted by IDHE UMR 8533 CNRS at
Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan
61, Avenue du Président Wilson 94235 Cachan Cedex, FRANCE
http://www.ens-cachan.fr/version-anglaise/about-the-ens-cachan/
International Conference Call for Papers

Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan - 27-30 June 2011

61, Avenue du Président Wilson 94235 Cachan Cedex, France (south of Paris)
http://www.ens-cachan.fr/version-anglaise/

Conference Organizers :
Isabel da Costa, Senior Researcher CNRS-IDHE, President ISA/RC10; France
Alain Chouraqui, CNRS Research Director, Director of the IFEP, past President ISA/RC10, France
György Szell, Prof. em. Dr., University of Osnabrück, Germany, past President ISA/RC10, Germany
Scientific Committee :
Claude Didry, CNRS Research Director, Director of IDHE, France
Annette Jobert, CNRS Research Director, IDHE, France
Janine Goetschy, Senior Researcher CNRS-IDHE, Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense, France
Udo Rehfeldt, Senior Researcher IRES, France)
Jean Philippe Agresti, Deputy Director IFEP, Université Paul Cézanne, Aix-Marseille, France
Francesco Garibaldo, President RLDWL, Vice-President ISA/RC10, Italy
Volker Telljohann, Senior Researcher IRES Emilia Romagna, Italy)
Heinz Sünker, University of Wuppertal and past President ISA/RC10, Germany
Julia Rozanova, Yale University, USA and the University of British Columbia, Canada, ISA/RC10 Secretary


Democratic Participation in Employment and Societal Regulation
Regulation issues have become priorities in the political agendas of most European countries confronted with global economic, financial and social crises, while the capability of some of the institutions of the political and civil society to deal with these changes has come under scrutiny and even sometimes questioning. This evolution has once more brought to the fore the issue of democratic participation, particularly in the field of industrial relations where it has been an important concern ever since the publication of the book Industrial Democracy by Sidney and Beatrice Webb in 1897 launched the first international debate around this issue. Democratic participation in employment and societal regulation will thus constitute the main theme of this conference.
Major reforms, notably those concerning social security and industrial relations arrangements, have recently taken place in many European countries. Old arrangements are being challenged and new actors and interaction arenas have emerged. These trends will be discussed in several plenary sessions and workshops by participants coming from different disciplines as well as backgrounds bringing complementary perspectives to an open and pluralistic debate. Beyond academic achievement we also hope that our exchanges might contribute to an increased awareness of these issues that might help orient the future actions of the European social actors. Some of these actors are expected to directly participate in the discussions during several round tables as well as in the networking during the conference.
The conference will be organized around several main themes that will be addressed both in plenary sessions and workshops. It will also include round tables with invited guests, a forward looking session and a joint session between ISA RC10 (International Sociological Association, Research Committee 10 on Participation, Organizational Democracy & Self-Management) and ESA RN17 (European Sociological Association, Research Network 17 on Industrial Relations, Labour Market Institutions and Employment), resulting from a collaboration between our two networks started when Franz Traxler was President of RN17 (this joint session will be dedicated to his memory).
1. Social Actors in a Multi-level and Multi-modal Regulation
Organized by Alain Chouraqui, Jean Philippe Agresti & György Széll
The aim of this stream is to contribute to the understanding of the interaction between rights and regulations on the one hand, and social transformations, crises and diverse types of changes on the other hand.
The communications will focus on the role of social actors in the process of social transformation in a perspective of multi-level and multi-modal regulations.
This will be done in a multidisciplinary manner, in order to analyse:
* how law affects social regulation, but at the same time, it is also affected or produced by social interaction;

  • the effects of crises and other social transformations on the forms, levels and articulations of different regulations, (legal, social, political, economic or other);
* and the evolution of the roles of the actors and institutions in these regulatory processes.
This should be done as well in the global dimension and focussing on European experiences.
2. Democratic participation and civil society in the world of work
Organized by Francesco Garibaldo & Volker Telljohann

The cultural aspiration for participatory democratic society and more equitable social distribution of power continues to be formally highly valued in European societies. Yet, as a number of social analysts have observed, many aspects of democratic practices have seriously diminished in some key areas of social life in recent years. Economic processes seem to be less controlled by social, political, administrative and cultural instances of regulation. This lack of control entails a divide between economic institutions and society at large.
The world of labour is an important area where this divide can be observed. The world of labour and employment, which since the mid-20th century has been regarded as a vital arena for the advancement of participatory democracy, appears at the present time powerfully influenced by forces and interests that weaken and undermine this social project. The aspiration for wide social participation in the regulation and governance of labour and workplaces encounters a crisis. Current tendencies in the management of production organizations and industrial relations require workers’ integration not through democratic citizenship and representation, but through conformity to elite-established rules and systems. The recalibration of capital and labour relations that has ensued has weakened not only workers and their trade unions in socio-political roles but threatens the practices and values of social democracy itself. The search for socio-cultural innovation is thus a pressing theoretical and practical project.
The aim of this theme will be to analyze current concerns in regard to the conditions of labour markets, production organizations, working conditions, and industrial and employment relations. Prominent among these concerns is the crisis in trade unions and in democratic labour market institutions, and the rise of what many critics regard as technocratic administrative powers displacing democratic practices. These concerns, which may be seen as part of broader crisis in democracy, require careful evidence-based analysis. What are the principal factors of the crisis? How successful are current efforts in response? Has a recalibration of labour and capital relations set an institutional path dependency for a long time to come? What are the options for social and economic policies? In this context, theoretical approaches analyzing the need for new governance systems at all societal levels will be discussed as well as the need for a new definition of the role of the State and the civil society.
3. Participation throughout life: from Childhood and Youth Education to Aging.
Organized by Julia Rozanova & Heinz Sünker
Democracy is based on the existence of educated and informed citizens. Real education is based on the competences of all members of a society, and is a life-long process. To accomplish this we need to deal with experiences of participation in the lives of people of all ages, from children and youth to young adults, to individuals in mid-life and to older adults. As the opposite of participation is exclusion, it is also essential to consider mechanisms by which society may exclude some groups of citizens from participation because of their age (or other characteristics). It is particularly relevant in the case of young children, who may be considered too young to be competent to meaningfully participate in the process of making decisions that have direct impact on their lives, and the oldest ones, who are considered too old to have competencies for meaningful participation. This exclusion from participation of certain age groups on the assumption of their political and social incompetence may be rife with potential controversies and neglect of their interests and ultimately exploitation. Therefore participation is a key component in concepts of politics of childhood and youth as well as later life. The papers addressing this theme will deal with different approaches concerned with participation across the life-course in different societies, with particular emphasis on participation in childhood and youth and in later life (separately or in comparative perspective).
4. European Governance: a model of employment and societal regulation?
Organized by Janine Goetschy (IDHE) & tbc
Social Europe developments have been closely linked to three major factors: a) the dynamics of the European integration project – in particular the nature of its successive enlargements, b) its successive political economy objectives (internal market, EMU, the Lisbon Strategy, Europe 2020), and c) EU Members States’ own social and employment evolving policy agendas.
Over the last 50 years, the EU level has been displaying a complex web of substantive and procedural rules in the field of employment and social policy. This stream aims at understanding the ways in which such a European web of rules was built over time. What is their degree of internal coherence or fragmentation? What can be said about their relevance vis-à-vis evolving social and employment agendas at national and world levels?
Similar questions will be addressed as regards EU rule-making procedures. Indeed, the profound legitimacy component inherent to social matters, the EU treaties content (and their limitations) as well as growing EU internal diversity have been leading over time to a plurality of EU regulatory modes (legislative, open method of coordination, corporatist).
Social Europe has been built as a result of contradictory forces among Member States, among social partners as well as among EU supra-national institutions around evolving policy agendas. Over recent years, one could witness new tensions regarding the balance to be found between deepened freedom of movement and the respect of social rights, and as concerns the question of migrant workers. This stream aims at taking stock of past Social Europe developments as well as of the more recent tensions which have arisen in last years – tensions likely to have been increasing even more with the two economic and financial crises (2008 and 2009).

5. European Social Dialogue
Organized by Annette Jobert & Claude Didry
European Social Dialogue (ESD) is now a Treaty procedure associating the European Social Partners to the elaboration of European legislation on employment relations and workers’ participation in certain enterprises’ choices or decisions. It originated in the 1980’s under the Delors Presidency alongside the theme of the ‘democratization of the economy’ in the 1970’s. Twenty years after its institutionalisation, ESD poses several major questions to be addressed in this stream.

  • How does ESD deepen the dynamic of European integration launched by Jacques Delors, through an extension of the Dialogue from specialised negotiations on the issues of the employment contract and the working time, to more general deliberations on new European policies that imply choices of models of society? Its contribution to the discussion on the work life balance, the general interest services or the energy policies for example, involves exchanges with civil society representatives which could lead to a renewal of the social dialogue through its opening to what has been called the ‘civil dialogue’.
  • The institutions produced by the ESD such as the EWC directive or the Workers Information and Consultation directive are major contributions to the enhancement of the capabilities of the workers representatives to weigh on the choices of the firms. What are the concrete results of such directives in the European economy? Do the national implementations of these directives give actual capability for voices to the workers, especially in countries where unions and workers representations have been weakened by liberal policies, such as the UK or the PECO? Do the new forms of representation resulting from these directives provide capabilities to the restructuring processes that firms face in an internationalised economy?
6. Employee participation through EWCs and in the framework of the European Company (SE)
Organized and led by Udo Rehfeldt (IRES) & Michael Stollt (ETUI)
The 1994 European directive on European works councils (EWCs) was a late outcome of a project of European legislation dating back to 1970, the European Company Statute, in which the European Commission provided simultaneously three channels for employee participation:

  • European collective agreements concluded directly between the company and the unions represented in the various institutions,
  • a European works council to be regularly informed on the evolution of economic and social parameters of the company and to be consulted prior to any major changes,
  • participation of employee representatives in the supervisory board for at least a third of its members.
In the 1970s, the Commission's draft, which was largely inspired by the German system of codetermination, had provoked hostile reactions not only by employers’ organizations but also by most of the EC-9 unions. It was only in 1994 that a European directive finally imposed negotiations on the establishment of EWCs with information and consultation rights in transnational companies. This legislation was complemented in 2000 by a regulation and a directive on the European company (SE), which imposes negotiations on employee involvement including board level participation. The third part of the initial Commission project, transnational collective bargaining, has developed in the last ten years without a legal basis. It will be subject of another session of this conference.
There are several similarities between the EWC directive and the SE directive. They share a common model of voluntary negotiations with a special negotiation body (SNB) backed by minimal subsidiary provisions in case of failure of the negotiations. The main differences concern the initiative for these negotiations (employee representatives for the EWC, management for the SE) as well as the time constraint (three years for the EWC, six months for the SE).
The stream will try to make an assessment of both forms of workers participation. How have EWC and SEs spread over the years? What is the quality of these agreements? What is the impact of the participation rights for the defence of workers’ interests in practice? How were strategic decisions of the company influenced, in particular in the case of transnational restructuring? How are unions involved in these fields? What will be the impact of the 2009 revision of the EWC directive when it comes into effect in 2011?
7. Joint session ISA/RC10 and ESA/RN17: Evolutions in labour and employment relations
dedicated to the late Franz Traxler
Organized by Bernd Brandl & Isabel da Costa
The organization of labour has always been sensitive to crises and has faced fundamental changes in the past. The impact of previous crises on organized labour has frequently been perceived as dramatic particularly as regards the evolution of employment and restructuring. Communications in this session will focus on the implications of the current economic crisis for the interaction between policy and organized labour taking into account past experiences and past changes: will labour relations undergo restructuring processes on a scale similar or even larger than the alterations caused by shocks of 1929 or the oil crisis of the 1970s? To what extent will industrial relations affect and be affected by policy responses to the crisis? How has the public sector been affected in different countries? At what levels have what changes been more often addressed – local, sector, region, national, European, international? What hypothesis and methods have researchers, analysts and/or actors used to address these issues? What kind of new issues have emerged with the recent crisis?
The joint session will also include communications dedicated to Franz Traxler's contribution to the understanding labour and employment relations.

Deadlines:
* Abstract proposals indicating in which conference theme to be included preferably should be sent to : rc10conference2011@gmail.com before 15 February 2011.
The deadline for sending abstracts has been extended to the 6th of March 2011.

* The Scientific Committee will notify its acceptance of the abstracts to authors by 15 March 2011
* Full papers should reach the same electronic address by 15 June 2011
Please don’t hesitate to contact us via the electronic address if these deadlines should be a problem for financial demands to your institution